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  • 3 months without vehicle

    I've been without wheels for a month before virus, hopefully I will get great advice from a good forum!?

    1998 Contour 2.0L -

    Ran it out of gas then replaced fuel pump and filter, it has Spark and it wouldn't even stay running with starting fluid (I had to try) only backfires once... Did I did the engine? What can I do? Car has auto start, but I've never been able to get it to start when it ran. Please help!

    Thx,

    ​​​​​​Trevor

  • #2
    If it has those things, first verify that you have proper compression. If so, then your issue is one of timing.

    There are three things that make an engine run: spark, fuel, and compression. But these things generally have to occur at a specific time. If you spark on the exhaust stroke then nothing will happen. Assuming it is a fuel-injected engine, if the fuel is injected at the wrong time it will cause manifold wetting, and potentially icing, but also a poorly running engine or a no-start condition. This will not be an issue on a carbureted engine. if the camshaft(s) is(are) not correctly kept in time with the crankshaft the engine will not run well, if at all.

    To start: check compression. If it is high or low compared to specification your issue could lie there in the cylinders that are high/low. If it is high/low on all cylinders, then look for a cam timing issue. Check your timing chain or belt. Some engines are called interference engines meaning the valves and pistons just miss each other under normal operation. If your belt breaks in one, you will have bent the valves on at least all companion cylinders (based on firing order) this will require rebuilding or replacing your cylinder heads. Also, not getting proper airflow info an engine will lower compression, so look for airflow restrictions. If it's too high, it's either carbon build-up or retarded cam timing. You will not be able to check the vacuum until the engine is running.

    If you are hearing a backfire in the intake or firing into the exhaust manifold, check spark timing. This will be an incorrectly adjusted distributor or a faulty crankshaft position sensor or wiring *in most, but not all, vehicles - depending on engine management strategy. Each manufacturer does things a little differently*

    If you have an erratic poorly running issue, combined with strong gasoline or rotten egg smell, check fuel timing. This would most likely be due to a failed camshaft position sensor, on a fuel-injected car. Also, the intake manifold may be cold to the touch, if it is icing at all.

    Comment


    • #3
      If it has those things, first verify that you have proper compression. If so, then your issue is one of timing.

      There are three things that make an engine run: spark, fuel, and compression. But these things generally have to occur at a specific time. If you spark on the exhaust stroke then nothing will happen. Assuming it is a fuel injected engine, if the fuel is injected at the wrong time it will cause manifold wetting, and potentially icing, but also a poor running engine or a no start condition. This will not be an issue on a carbureted engine. if the camshaft(s) is(are) not correctly kept in time with the crankshaft the engine will not run well, if at all.

      To start: check compression. If it is high or low compared to specification your issue could lie there in the cylinders that are high/low. If it is high/low on all cylinders, then look for a cam timing issue. Check your timing chain or belt. Some engines are called interference engines meaning the valves and pistons just miss each other under normal operation. If your belt breaks in one, you will have bent the valves on at least all companion cylinders (based on firing order) this will require rebuilding or replacing your cylinder heads. Also, not getting proper airflow info an engine will lower compression, so look for airflow restrictions. If it's too high, it's either carbon build-up or retarded cam timing. You will not be able to check the vacuum until the engine is running.

      If you are hearing a backfire in the intake or firing into the exhaust manifold, check spark timing. This will be an incorrectly adjusted distributor or a faulty crankshaft position sensor or wiring *in most, but not all, vehicles - depending on engine management strategy. Each manufacturer does things a little differently*

      If you have an erratic poorly running issue, combined with strong gasoline or rotten egg smell, check fuel timing. This would most likely be due to a failed camshaft position sensor, on a fuel-injected car. Also, the intake manifold may be cold to the touch, if it is icing at all.

      Comment

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